The Dark Fantastic: Emancipating the Imagination

shadesandsupers:

electricpeoples:

harlequinnade:


Heroes For Hire #1Civil War

characters that deserve a lot more attention: Misty Knight 

This is one of my favorite panels in general just because Misty gets to express some agency and call out these ~big important white dudes~ on the ridiculousness of their ~big important white dude~ fight, but if you look at the context, it’s really just Spidey doing casual acrobats while he, Iron Man, and Reed Richards kind of awkwardly ignore her opinion and her position, while pulling the this couldn’t possibly be about race or gender card. They tried to use her for their own purposes and then she expressly refused and went in on their moral ambiguity, and they were like crap she has an opinion now we have to act condescending and uninterested.
But it’s also a good example of how Black characters in comics have consistently been used as this “alternative” or “dissenting” force whenever some major morally charged event is happening. It’s like they pulled Misty out just because they needed a Black woman to engage in this argument, then threw her back in obscurity. The scene fits really well with her character, but it’s still pretty weird.

You better tell it.

shadesandsupers:

electricpeoples:

harlequinnade:

Heroes For Hire #1
Civil War

characters that deserve a lot more attention: Misty Knight 

This is one of my favorite panels in general just because Misty gets to express some agency and call out these ~big important white dudes~ on the ridiculousness of their ~big important white dude~ fight, but if you look at the context, it’s really just Spidey doing casual acrobats while he, Iron Man, and Reed Richards kind of awkwardly ignore her opinion and her position, while pulling the this couldn’t possibly be about race or gender card. They tried to use her for their own purposes and then she expressly refused and went in on their moral ambiguity, and they were like crap she has an opinion now we have to act condescending and uninterested.

But it’s also a good example of how Black characters in comics have consistently been used as this “alternative” or “dissenting” force whenever some major morally charged event is happening. It’s like they pulled Misty out just because they needed a Black woman to engage in this argument, then threw her back in obscurity. The scene fits really well with her character, but it’s still pretty weird.

You better tell it.

bookpatrol:

Straightjacket by Joseph DeCamillis

Joseph DeCamillis is a self described life-long reader. He was on the creative writing path when the art bug got him and he’s never looked back. For the last 10 plus years his focus has been on book inspired art. One jewel is his autobiographical Straightjacket, an assemblage of hardback book covers and various items of deconstructed clothing.

DeCamillis had two criteria for choosing the books used:

1.  Reading the book had a major impact on his personality at some stage of his life
2.  Title and/or subject of the book connects to some piece of his past.

His tag line for the piece is “What You Read is What You Get”

 More photos: Straightjacket - Joseph DeCamillis 

Flavorwire highlights DeCamillis’ amazing miniature paintings on old books 

(via bookporn)

sycamoreleaf:

To celebrate the old “thank god the project is over” moment, I took to the therapeutic qualities of drawing Varda’s hair, and since beguilingblackness suggested a stars and space scene why not have everyone’s favorite Queen of the Stars work on her craft of star-making?

sycamoreleaf:

To celebrate the old “thank god the project is over” moment, I took to the therapeutic qualities of drawing Varda’s hair, and since beguilingblackness suggested a stars and space scene why not have everyone’s favorite Queen of the Stars work on her craft of star-making?

“Young writers should read books past bedtime and write things down in notebooks when they are supposed to be doing something else.”
— Lemony Snicket (via wethinkwedream)

(Source: lemonysnicketblog, via hronfeldt)

“Yet pity is of two kinds: one is of kinship recognised, and is near to love; the other is of difference of fortune perceived, and is near to pride. I speak of the former.”
— Finrod in Athrabeth Finrod ah Andreth,Morgoth’s Ring - J.R.R Tolkien (via daughter-of-clovers)

(via houseofhaleth)

lightspeedsound:

Bethann Hardison on racism in the fashion industry.

From About Face: Supermodels then and now

(via ethiopienne)

fuckyeahdcmarvel:

the-ass-king:

why-i-love-comics:

Storm #1

written by Greg Pak
art by Victor Ibanez

damn son

Actually I can

Got it on release day!

(via shadesandsupers)

“Books are meat and medicine
and flame and flight and flower
steel, stitch, cloud and clout,
and drumbeats on the air.”
— Gwendolyn Brooks (via talkativolive)

(via ethiopienne)

“In class, we read the popular Dick and Jane books. I remember wondering if they had any black friends in their perfect little picket-fence world. According to a quick Google search, they actually did have black friends—the Pam and Penny twins. My school must not have carried those editions, though, because I don’t remember any people of color in those books. I wonder if there had been, if I would have taken more of an interest in reading.”

Don Tate, on a guest post on the Bookpeople’s Blog

Read the full post here.

(via leeandlow)

blackfolksmakingcomics:

Lightning.

Amanda Waller.

Milestone Media’s Rocket.

Thunder.

Bumblebee.

Vixen.

Representation matters, kids. 

(Source: fanbingblink, via racebending)